Conservation Easements

Landowners can conserve their land while maintaining ownership of the land through a Conservation Easement. A Conservation Easement is a legal agreement between a landowner and a qualified organization, such as a land trust, that restricts specific activities on the land to protect its conservation values.

Conservation Easements allow the landowner to maintain ownership of the land while limiting future development. The property can also be sold or passed onto heirs, with the Conservation Easement forever restricting the land as the original landowner planned, ensuring their wishes for conservation in perpetuity.

Landowners can choose to restrict areas of their land from development, while also setting aside development zones for the future, ensuring a balance between the built environment and the protection of natural resources on the property. Conservation Easements can also ensure future uses on the land if they are in agreement with the goals of the Conservation Easement. For example, the cutting of a limited percentage of trees for firewood, as long as it is within the standards for ensuring a healthy forest, can be specified; hunting on the property to continue to manage healthy wildlife populations can also be permitted.

Each easement is unique to the land it governs. Richland Soil and Water Conservation District suggests working with a legal professional to develop the easement so that it conforms to the wishes of the donor and protects the conservation values of the land.

Conservation Plans

The Conservation Plan Process

  • Schedule an on-site visit to address concerns you have about your property’s resources 
  • You determine and share your objectives
  • While on-site, your property’s resources are evaluated with respect to your objectives
  • If needed, recommended practices are discussed with you
  • You decide which conservation practices you want to implement
  • A Conservation Plan is created for you
  • Technicians will survey, design, draft and lay out the practice for construction
  • We will work with the Farm Service Agency (FSA) and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) in the allocation of cost share funds for the project, if available and/or wanted
  • Implement the Conservation Plan
  • Evaluate the Conservation Plan

What is a Conservation Plan?

An agricultural/livestock owner tries to run their operation as efficiently as possible. Sometimes certain areas become problems to their operations. These operators may seek the assistance of USDA-NRCS to develop a conservation plan. This plan will help the operator address these problem areas and other areas that could affect natural resources. Through the use of Conservation Practices, NRCS can help the operator determine what conservation practices will correct these concern areas. There are many Conservation Practices that NRCS has developed, but the following are a list of commonly installed practices in Richland County. At the conclusion of the plan creation, material will be provided to you to help implement the plan.

Examples of Conservation Practices

Access Roads

Farming operations often utilize frequently traveled areas to access particular areas of the farm. Sometimes these areas become rutted, muddy, pot-holes. This can be due to an unsuitable soil type in that area, the physical location of the area or poor weather conditions. An Access Road can be used to protect these areas. They are developed by installing a particular depth of gravel material to withstand frequent travel. They protect soil, water, air, wildlife and other adjacent resource areas.

Agrichemical Facility

Many farming operations frequently use fertilizers and chemicals to maintain their crops. Rather than hire a company to apply these chemicals, an operator may want to apply their own. To do this they need to have storage tanks on-site to store the appropriate chemicals. If any of the tanks were to develop a leak it could be a big threat to natural resources. An Agrichemical Facility addresses this situation. It is a designed basin with an impermeable liner where all storage tanks are placed. In the event of a leak or a spill while mixing, all chemicals would be contained, pumped out and disposed of properly.

Fences

Livestock operations need to keep their animals within certain areas. Also, it has been found to be beneficial to have smaller pasture fields and rotate livestock within these fields at regular intervals. This promotes healthier vegetation in the pastures, better nourished livestock and erosion protection.

Filter Strip

A filter strip, typically adjacent to a ditch, stream or river, is an area of vegetation established for removing sediment, organic material, and other pollutants from runoff and wastewater.

Grassed Waterway

When a whole field is tilled and planted, there may be areas where two hill slopes come together (what we call a swale). During a rain, water will naturally flow to these swales and eventually to a stream or creek. In some instances, the slope, soil type, tilling type, tilling direction or all of the above are not adequate to hold the soil in place. Eventually, these swales become gullies that can be difficult or impossible to cross and they carry sediment to the steam or creek. Grassed Waterways are engineered, shallow grassed channels designed to handle the water flow, keep soil in place while allowing cropping equipment to safely cross over it.

Grazing Management (Prescribed)

This is the management of the kind of animal, animal number, grazing distribution, length of grazing and/or browsing periods and timing of use to provide grazed plants sufficient recovery time to meet planned objectives. The management of livestock movements is based on the rate of plant growth, available forage, and allowable utilization target. Proper grazing management will maintain and improve vegetation and soil conditions, improve water quality, and enhance wildlife habitat.

Heavy Use Pad

Livestock operations utilize certain areas frequently to feed and water their animals. Sometimes these areas become rutted, muddy pot-holes. This can be due to an unsuitable soil type in that area, the physical location of the area, poor weather conditions or frequent use. A Heavy Use Pad can be used to protect these highly used areas. They are developed by installing a particular depth of gravel material to withstand the frequent travel. They protect soil, water, air, wildlife and other adjacent resource areas.

Seasonal High Tunnel

This practice is intended to extend the growing season earlier and later in the growing year. Tunnel systems are designed to extend the cropping season and benefit natural resources by improving plant quality, soil quality, and water quality through methods such as reduced nutrient and pesticide transport. A seasonal high tunnel is a polyethylene-covered structure with or without electricity, heating, or mechanical ventilation systems. High tunnels modify the climate to create more favorable growing conditions for vegetable and other specialty crops grown in the natural soil beneath it. Crops must be grown in the soil under the high tunnel, not in pots, growing racks or hydroponics systems. The structure utilizes passive solar heating and can use a supplemental heating system, if required. Ventilation is usually provided by manually rolling the sides up or down. However, mechanical systems may be used to improve effectiveness. High tunnel systems are not greenhouses.

Nutrient Management

Nutrient management involves managing the amount, placement, and timing of plant nutrients to obtain optimum yields and minimize the risk of surface and groundwater pollution.

The 4Rs were created to educate and promote wise nutrient management to conserve water quality and soil health using four “rights”:

  • Right Source: Ensure a balanced supply of essential nutrients, considering both naturally available sources and the characteristics of specific products, in plant available forms.
  • Right Rate: Assess and make decisions based on soil nutrient supply and plant demand.
  • Right Time: Assess and make decisions based on the dynamics of crop uptake, soil supply, nutrient loss risks, and field operation logistics.
  • Right Place: Address root-soil dynamics and nutrient movement, and manage spatial variability within the field to meet site-specific crop needs and limit potential losses from the field.

Waste Storage Facility

The main byproduct of livestock operations is manure. Fortunately, manure is also a valuable resource, and it can be applied back on the land where it will provide nutrients and organic matter to the soil. However, manure cannot be applied at any time. Care must be taken to apply manure when the land is ready to receive it. It cannot be applied when the ground is saturated with rain, right before a rain event or on frozen-snow covered ground. Manure obviously cannot be applied when agricultural crops are actively growing. As you can see it can be difficult to find suitable conditions to apply the manure. A lot of operations do not have the adequate manure storage capacity to wait for the ideal application situation. A Waste Storage Facility provides a stable facility with enough storage capacity to hold the waste until ideal land application opportunity exist. The storage structure types include liquid waste storage ponds or tanks, and solid waste stacking structures.

Windbreaks

Windbreaks or shelterbelts are single to multiple rows of trees and possibly shrubs planted in a linear fashion. They are established upwind of the areas to be protected. Windbreaks and shelterbelts are primarily used to reduce soil erosion from wind; protect crops, livestock, and farmsteads from wind; area related microclimate effects; control snow deposition; and improve air quality by intercepting drifting chemicals and odors.

Energy

Conservation practices contribute to energy efficiency and fuel savings.

The Benefits of a Conservation Plan

A conservation plan ensures that the land’s unique natural resources are managed in the best possible way, while maintaining sustainability and productivity.

Other benefits of a conservation plan:

  • Help landowner comply with environmental regulations
  • Qualify landowner for USDA conservation programs that can help him or her implement conservation measures
  • Adapts to changing farm or ranch operational goals
  • Establishes an implementation schedule that fits landowner’s timetable and resources

Richland County Food Producer List

Now, more than ever, buying locally grown and produced food is vital to our community!  With the events of 2020 impacting some food availability, a free list is being assembled of where consumers may purchase food grown and produced in Richland County. The goal is to help the public find locally grown and produced food products and connect local food producers to consumers. Consumers may develop a better understanding of where their food comes from, how it is produced and get to know the people who have a passion for offering fresh food. 

How can you get involved?

Are you a local food producer? Get added to the list.

See who is on the list.

To learn more about the list, visit Richland County Grower and Producers List.

This effort is supported by:

  • Destination Mansfield-Richland County
  • North End Community Improvement Collaborative
  • OSU Extension – Richland County
  • Richland Area Chamber & Economic Development
  • Richland County Farm Bureau
  • Richland Soil and Water Conservation District

Agriculture Pollution Abatement Program

The Ohio Department of Agriculture — Division of Soil and Water Conservation has the authority to establish standards for a level of management and conservation practices in farming and animal feeding operations. The purpose of these standards is to reduce pollution of waters of the state by soil sediment, animal manure and residual farm products.

Nutrient management involves managing the amount, placement, and timing of plant nutrients to obtain optimum yields and minimize the risk of surface and groundwater pollution.

The 4Rs

The 4Rs were created to educate and promote wise nutrient management to conserve water quality and soil health using four “rights”:

  • Right Source: Ensure a balanced supply of essential nutrients, considering both naturally available sources and the characteristics of specific products, in plant available forms.
  • Right Rate: Assess and make decisions based on soil nutrient supply and plant demand.
  • Right Time: Assess and make decisions based on the dynamics of crop uptake, soil supply, nutrient loss risks, and field operation logistics.
  • Right Place: Address root-soil dynamics and nutrient movement, and manage spatial variability within the field to meet site-specific crop needs and limit potential losses from the field.

ODA and OSU Extension Offer Online Pesticide Re-Certification

During the COVID-19 Pandemic, the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), is partnering with the Ohio State University Extension Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP) to temporarily provide online recertification for pesticide applicators and fertilizer certificate holders whose licenses expired in spring of 2020. The online recertification will be available Monday, July 6. For commercial applicators, it will be available August 10.  For more information or to register for the online recertification, visit Pesticide Certification

The online option allows private applicators and fertilizer certificate holders due for training by March 31, 2020 and commercial applicators due for training by September 30, 2020 to meet their continuing education requirements. The cost for online training is $35 for private applicators and $10 for fertilizer certification. The price per credit hour for commercial applicators is $15. If you don’t know your license number, please call ODA at 614-728-6987, choose option 1.

Applicators are still required to meet their recertification requirements to renew licenses and certifications.  As a result of HB 197, applicators have until 90 days after the emergency is over or December 1, whichever comes first, to complete their requirements.  Recertification status can be checked online here. Applicators must also submit a completed renewal application and pay an additional fee to the ODA for licensure.

For additional information regarding online recertification, please contact the Ohio Department of Agriculture at 614-728-6987, and press 1 for licensing recertification or the OSU Pesticide Safety Education Program at 614-292-4070.

Commercial applicators must earn at least five recertification credit hours every three years, and Private applicators must earn at least three recertification credit hours every three years. One hour (60 minutes) must be earned by taking one or more core education classes, one half-hour (30 minutes) of education in each category on the license, and the remaining time requirement can be met by attending classes in any category.

Manure Management

Manure management is an important aspect of livestock farming in Ohio. Livestock operations should have a site specific plan, called a Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans (CNMPs) that includes the best practices and strategies to manage the collection, storage and land application of manure. Many livestock farmers collect and store manure over a period of time before applying it to a field. A CNMP recommends the size of manure storage structure based on the number of livestock, the desired frequency of field application, and environmental conditions, such as frozen ground. The producer should be able to store manure during the times of the year that have an increased risk of nutrient loss, such as the winter months when the ground is frozen. Manure is fertilizer because it contains nutrients vital for plant growth. When manure is spread on a field with growing plants the nutrients in the manure become available to the plant. Sampling the soil in the field will let a producer know how much of a nutrient is already in the soil before applying manure. There is a greater risk of nutrients will leave the field in water that runs off the surface or drains into field tile if the soil contains more nutrients than the plants need. Farms that import manure to spread on fields should also have a nutrient management plan. Nutrient management plans for these farms document practices on the fields receiving manure and amount of nutrients already in the soil.

For more information, please visit https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/national/plantsanimals/livestock/afo/?cid=stelprdb1042911

The USDA is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

The USDA is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

December 14 marked the Richland Soil & Water Conservation District’s first completed easement in the Farmland Preservation Program also known as The Clean Ohio Local Agricultural Easement Purchase Program (LAEPP). Cass & Lisa Gwirtz applied to the program and their farm has been approved by the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) Office of Farmland Preservation in conjunction with Richland Soil & Water Conservation District, who acts as the local sponsor for the program. This means their farm is protected by a perpetual easement from future residential or commercial development and will remain a farm for generations to come.

Watch this video on the importance of the Farmland Preservation Program to the Gwirtz family.

If you would like to consider the advantages of preserving your farmland for future generations, there are two options:

  1. The Agricultural Easement Donation Program (AEDP) is a tool for landowners to protect their farm’s soils, natural resource features, and scenic open space. It provides landowners the opportunity to donate the easement rights on viable farmland to the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA). The department assures the land remains in agricultural use forever. The standard cost for services needed to secure the easement (i.e., title examination, title policy, escrow, closing and recordation) are covered by ODA. All easement transactions are permanent. They are recorded on the property deed and will transfer with the land to successive owners.
  2. The Clean Ohio Local Agricultural Easement Purchase Program (LAEPP) provides funding to farmland owners for placing an agricultural easement on their property. Monies are issued for up to 75 percent of the appraised value of a farm’s development rights. A payment cap has been set at $2,000 per acre, with a maximum of $500,000 per farm. All easement transactions are recorded on the property deed and transfer with the land to successive owners. Funds from the purchase of these easements are invested in the local economy by the landowners who use them by expanding their farming operations, purchasing new equipment, reducing debt, adding conservation practices, planning for retirement, sending their children to college or for other purposes. When the state purchases a farmland easement, the proceeds are plowed into Ohio’s economy.

The 2022 Farmland Preservation Program for Richland County is open, and accepting applications thru March 4, 2022. For additional information visit the ODA webpage on Farmland Preservation or contact Matt Wallace at 419-747-8687 for details.

The Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands and wetlands and their related benefits. Under the Agricultural Land Easements component (ALE) of ACEP, NRCS provides financial assistance to eligible partners for purchasing Agricultural Land Easements that protect the agricultural use and conservation values of eligible land. In the case of working farms, the program helps farmers and ranchers keep their land in agriculture. The program also protects grazing uses and related conservation values by conserving grassland. Eligible partners include Indian tribes, state and local governments, and non-governmental organizations that have farmland or grassland protection programs. Under the ALE component, NRCS may contribute up to 50 percent of the fair market value of the agricultural land easement. Where NRCS determines that grasslands of special environmental significance will be protected, NRCS may contribute up to 75 percent of the fair market value of the agricultural land easement. In Fiscal Year 2019, the applicant will need to describe how the grassland offered for enrollment fits the definition of Grassland of Special Environmental Significance. Easement values for ALE are based on a fair market appraisal. Though signup is continuous, funding selections are made at specific times during the fiscal year.

For more information and how to apply, visit https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/oh/programs/easements/acep/NRCSEPRD416633/

Conservation

The Ohio Land Trust Directory was created by the Coalition of Ohio Land Trusts. Formed in 2004, the Coalition of Ohio Land Trusts (COLT) is a voluntary network of land trusts and other conservation organizations dedicated to advancing land conservation for public benefit in Ohio. COLT provides a forum for professional and technical support to the conservation organizations that work to conserve land. Ohio land trusts have diverse but complementary missions, ranging from the protection of watersheds, to the preservation of prime farmland, to the restoration of natural areas.

Ohio Department of Agriculture

The Ohio Department of Agriculture Office of Farmland Preservation implements the Clean Ohio Local Agricultural Easement Purchase Program, The Ohio Agricultural Easement Donation Program and provides technical assistance to communities implementing the Agricultural Security Area program.

Learn More About Cover Crops

What is a Cover Crop? Cover crops are plants that provide multiple benefits in a cropping system generally planted after the primary crop has been harvested.

Benefits of Cover Crops

Cover Crops provide a multitude of benefits which include the prevention of erosion, improve soil’s physical and biological properties, replace nutrients in the soil, suppress weeds, improves the availability of water in soil, and break pest cycles along with many other benefits. The species of cover crop selected along with its management determine the benefits and returns.

Some popular planting methods include traditional planter planting, aerial seeding, and broad cast seeding depending upon the type of seed being planted. Get more information from NRCS about cover crop selection, termination, and planting guides.

NRCS EQIP Cover Crop Program

The NRCS Disaster Recovery EQIP funding opportunity to plant cover crops on flooded cropland acreage. The sign-up begins July 1 and continues until the funding is exhausted.

MWCD Cover Crop Cost Share Program

The 2023 Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District Cover Crop Program is offering $12.00/acre with a cap of 200 approved acres per applicant across eligible counties in the jurisdictional boundary of the MWCD District unless fields are located within one of the specified MWCD Lake watersheds. For more information, contact Matt Wallace.

Ohio State University Cover Crop Information

This resource provides some of the positives and negatives associated with an extensive list of cover crops we see in Ohio. 

***Please Note, the disclaimer in the Fact Sheets that some of the seeding rates and dates may be slightly different than Appendix A.  Producers need to follow Appendix A for H2Ohio, EQIP, and other cost-share programs.

The USDA is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

Enrollment is Open!

Richland Soil & Water Conservation District is pleased to announce enrollment is open in Richland County for the H2Ohio Program for crop year 2025! If you or a farmer you know missed out or passed up the first opportunity to participate in this program, now is a great time to join! A nutrient management plan accounting for all N-P-K nutrients is required to participate in the program. Applications will be taken on a first come, first served basis.

This H2Ohio enrollment period IS NOT a part of the planned statewide rollout. It is being made available due to extra funding from the initial H2Ohio program rollout in Richland County for a one year, one-time contract (2025). Contracts will be awarded to producers once a verifiable nutrient management plan has been received, but farmers are allowed to apply beforehand (to get their foot in the door). Enrollment will only be accepted until all funds have been contracted. The deadline to enroll is May 31, 2024.

About H2Ohio

H2Ohio is a water quality program that offers monetary incentives to farmers/producers for implementing conservation-focused best management practices (BMPs). The aim is to encourage producers within the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB) to adopt practices that will help decrease phosphorus runoff from agricultural land. Lake Erie has been the focus of this project due to the harmful algal blooms that have occurred there. In 2020, the H2Ohio program was rolled out to fourteen counties within the WLEB. In 2021, the Ohio Department of Agriculture rolled out H2Ohio to the remaining ten counties within the WLEB, Richland County being one of them!

What It Consists Of

A suite of data driven BMPs make up the program. They include: establishing cover crops, adding small grains into your crop rotation, implementation of an SWCD/ODA approved nutrient management plan, manure/fertilizer placement and rate, and drainage water management.

Why It Matters

H2Ohio is a voluntary program that offers incentives to farmers who meet the requirements for the specific BMPs. In addition to the incentives, producers have the opportunity through H2Ohio to participate in the stewardship of their natural resources, as well as the resources of Ohioans next door or downstream. Again, the goal of the program is to decrease nutrient runoff from farmland. Additionally, the H2Ohio practices may assist in increasing soil health, conserving soil nutrients, and providing opportunities to try things a little differently.

For more information, visit: https://h2.ohio.gov/about-h2ohio/.

Lake Erie CREP H2Ohio Program

The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) is a USDA Farm Bill conservation program that offers farmers and landowners financial compensation for taking cropland out of production and establishing conservation practices such as buffer strips, grasslands, and wetlands to improve water quality for a contract period of 15 years. The new H2Ohio Water Quality Incentive Program is being offered in combination with Lake Erie CREP and provides a onetime payment of $2,000 per acre for new Lake Erie CREP wetlands and forested riparian buffers (buffer strip with trees) to help improve water quality in the Lake Erie watershed. More wetlands and forested riparian buffers will help reduce phosphorus runoff into Lake Erie. Both conservation practices are on the H2Ohio top 10 list of phosphorus reduction practices.

Examples of Conservation Practices

Access Roads

Farming operations often utilize frequently traveled areas to access particular areas of the farm. Sometimes these areas become rutted, muddy, pot-holes. This can be due to an unsuitable soil type in that area, the physical location of the area or poor weather conditions. An Access Road can be used to protect these areas. They are developed by installing a particular depth of gravel material to withstand frequent travel. They protect soil, water, air, wildlife and other adjacent resource areas.

Agrichemical Facility

Many farming operations frequently use fertilizers and chemicals to maintain their crops. Rather than hire a company to apply these chemicals, an operator may want to apply their own. To do this they need to have storage tanks on-site to store the appropriate chemicals. If any of the tanks were to develop a leak it could be a big threat to natural resources. An Agrichemical Facility addresses this situation. It is a designed basin with an impermeable liner where all storage tanks are placed. In the event of a leak or a spill while mixing, all chemicals would be contained, pumped out and disposed of properly.

Fences

Livestock operations need to keep their animals within certain areas. Also, it has been found to be beneficial to have smaller pasture fields and rotate livestock within these fields at regular intervals. This promotes healthier vegetation in the pastures, better nourished livestock and erosion protection.

Filter Strip

A filter strip, typically adjacent to a ditch, stream or river, is an area of vegetation established for removing sediment, organic material, and other pollutants from runoff and wastewater.

Grassed Waterway

When a whole field is tilled and planted, there may be areas where two hill slopes come together (what we call a swale). During a rain, water will naturally flow to these swales and eventually to a stream or creek. In some instances, the slope, soil type, tilling type, tilling direction or all of the above are not adequate to hold the soil in place. Eventually, these swales become gullies that can be difficult or impossible to cross and they carry sediment to the steam or creek. Grassed Waterways are engineered, shallow grassed channels designed to handle the water flow, keep soil in place while allowing cropping equipment to safely cross over it.

Grazing Management (Prescribed)

This is the management of the kind of animal, animal number, grazing distribution, length of grazing and/or browsing periods and timing of use to provide grazed plants sufficient recovery time to meet planned objectives. The management of livestock movements is based on the rate of plant growth, available forage, and allowable utilization target. Proper grazing management will maintain and improve vegetation and soil conditions, improve water quality, and enhance wildlife habitat.

Heavy Use Pad

Livestock operations utilize certain areas frequently to feed and water their animals. Sometimes these areas become rutted, muddy pot-holes. This can be due to an unsuitable soil type in that area, the physical location of the area, poor weather conditions or frequent use. A Heavy Use Pad can be used to protect these highly used areas. They are developed by installing a particular depth of gravel material to withstand the frequent travel. They protect soil, water, air, wildlife and other adjacent resource areas.

Seasonal High Tunnel

This practice is intended to extend the growing season earlier and later in the growing year. Tunnel systems are designed to extend the cropping season and benefit natural resources by improving plant quality, soil quality, and water quality through methods such as reduced nutrient and pesticide transport. A seasonal high tunnel is a polyethylene-covered structure with or without electricity, heating, or mechanical ventilation systems. High tunnels modify the climate to create more favorable growing conditions for vegetable and other specialty crops grown in the natural soil beneath it. Crops must be grown in the soil under the high tunnel, not in pots, growing racks or hydroponics systems. The structure utilizes passive solar heating and can use a supplemental heating system, if required. Ventilation is usually provided by manually rolling the sides up or down. However, mechanical systems may be used to improve effectiveness. High tunnel systems are not greenhouses.

Nutrient Management

Nutrient management involves managing the amount, placement, and timing of plant nutrients to obtain optimum yields and minimize the risk of surface and groundwater pollution.

The 4Rs were created to educate and promote wise nutrient management to conserve water quality and soil health using four “rights”:

  • Right Source: Ensure a balanced supply of essential nutrients, considering both naturally available sources and the characteristics of specific products, in plant available forms.
  • Right Rate: Assess and make decisions based on soil nutrient supply and plant demand.
  • Right Time: Assess and make decisions based on the dynamics of crop uptake, soil supply, nutrient loss risks, and field operation logistics.
  • Right Place: Address root-soil dynamics and nutrient movement, and manage spatial variability within the field to meet site-specific crop needs and limit potential losses from the field.

Waste Storage Facility

The main byproduct of livestock operations is manure. Fortunately, manure is also a valuable resource, and it can be applied back on the land where it will provide nutrients and organic matter to the soil. However, manure cannot be applied at any time. Care must be taken to apply manure when the land is ready to receive it. It cannot be applied when the ground is saturated with rain, right before a rain event or on frozen-snow covered ground. Manure obviously cannot be applied when agricultural crops are actively growing. As you can see it can be difficult to find suitable conditions to apply the manure. A lot of operations do not have the adequate manure storage capacity to wait for the ideal application situation. A Waste Storage Facility provides a stable facility with enough storage capacity to hold the waste until ideal land application opportunity exist. The storage structure types include liquid waste storage ponds or tanks, and solid waste stacking structures.

Windbreaks

Windbreaks or shelterbelts are single to multiple rows of trees and possibly shrubs planted in a linear fashion. They are established upwind of the areas to be protected. Windbreaks and shelterbelts are primarily used to reduce soil erosion from wind; protect crops, livestock, and farmsteads from wind; area related microclimate effects; control snow deposition; and improve air quality by intercepting drifting chemicals and odors.

Energy

Conservation practices contribute to energy efficiency and fuel savings.

The Benefits of a Conservation Plan

A conservation plan ensures that the land’s unique natural resources are managed in the best possible way, while maintaining sustainability and productivity.

Other benefits of a conservation plan:

  • Help landowner comply with environmental regulations
  • Qualify landowner for USDA conservation programs that can help him or her implement conservation measures
  • Adapts to changing farm or ranch operational goals
  • Establishes an implementation schedule that fits landowner’s timetable and resources

Forms

More Information