Richland Soil and Water

Richland SWCD Stormwater Permit office hours: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 12 noon 

Stormwater permit applications, checklists and information needed to obtain a stormwater permit are available at https://richlandswcd.net/services/water/stormwater/stormwater-documents-list. 

Please submit your stormwater permit application, site calculation form, permit fees and additional documents in person, via email to Contact@richlandswcd.net, or through US Mail by sending to: Richland SWCD, 1495 W. Longview Ave, Suite 205B, Mansfield, OH  44906.

The next Board Supervisor meeting will be held at Richland SWCD office on Thursday, November 19 at 5:00 p.m. If you wish to attend the meeting in person or via video conference, please contact Erica Thomas, District Program Administrator via email Director@richlandswcd.net. 

Vote in the public election to elect two (2) Board Supervisors by November 3, 2020. Click here  for the Election Legal Notice to find out how to vote and for information on the Candidates! 

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Now Hiring 2 Interns!

Apply by November 6, 2020 at 4:00 p.m.

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Board Supervisor Election

Vote by November 3

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New Rain Barrels In!

We're closing out prior barrels; buy one while you can!

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Common Milkweed Seed Pod
Collection Begins October 1

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Interactive Watershed Map of Richland County
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Neighbor's Work Together to Resolve Drainage Situation

We want to share with you a recent example of three (3) neighbor’s working together to resolve a drainage situation.  One neighbor invited Richland SWCD to meet with himself and his neighbors to share what has been happening, to discuss possible solutions and hear recommendations from Richland SWCD. Matt Wallace, District Technician, and Erica Thomas, District Administrator met with the group.  

To provide you with some background, one neighbor has a farm and the other two neighbors are home and landowners. Two neighbors have lived in their homes several years and the third built a home with driveway a few years ago.  The neighbor who recently built a home, also inherited a ditch from a previous owner that was intended to drain into the farm field. The farmer does not want the water to drain onto his field. The other homeowner has been experiencing septic back-ups into the home and some basement flooding. How can this be resolved to everyone’s satisfaction? 

The new homeowner suggested removing part of a dike along the manmade channel to eliminate septic saturation and back-up, basement flooding and keep it from draining onto the farm field.  This solution will allow water to flow back to an open meadow that was naturally wet before a past owner decided to channel it in one direction.  To reduce a potential mosquito problem, Matt recommended building bat and swallow houses. The benefit is two-fold. Building and installing it will be great family project, plus it uses natural methods instead of chemicals. By the time Matt and Erica were ready to leave, the neighbors were discussing how to get started on the project.  In the end, everyone seemed pleased and were ready to work toward achieving the same goal. We consider this a great day and visit and appreciate being invited to join in the discussion. 

A drainage issue like this one, is a civil matter. If you invite Richland SWCD to a meeting like the example above, we will schedule a time to meet the parties involved at the site and provide recommendations. Sometimes an intermediary like Richland SWCD who isn’t directly involved in a situation can help find a satisfactory resolution. Richland SWCD does not settle disputes and is not an enforcement agency. However, you may forge a stronger relationship with your neighbor. To learn more, clcik on  our Report a Concern page, call 419-747-8686 or click here to go to our Contact Us page. 

June 15, 2020

 

 Background: Adam Wade, Neighbor

 Foreground:  Matt Wallace, SWCD Technician

?Frequently Asked Questions

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  • Topsoil is the most productive soil layer.
    Topsoil is the most productive soil layer.

    It has varying amounts of organic matter (living and dead organisms), minerals, and nutrients.

  • Richland County has a total area of 318,080 acres.
    Richland County has a total area of 318,080 acres.

    That's 497 square miles!

  • The Continental Divide goes through Richland County.
    The Continental Divide goes through Richland County.

    It separates the runoff that goes to Lake Erie from runoff that goes to the Ohio River. 

  • Richland County has 18 Townships.
    Richland County has 18 Townships.

    It also has 3 cities (Mansfield, Ontario & Shelby) and 6 villages.

  • Everyone lives in a Watershed.
    Everyone lives in a Watershed.

    If you're in Richland County, the water from your watershed travels to either Lake Erie or the Ohio River.

  • Before you move earth on your land,
    Before you move earth on your land,

    you need to contact the Richland Soil and Water Conservation District to see if you need a stormwater permit.

  • It can take over 500 years
    It can take over 500 years

    to form an inch of topsoil in a natural environment not altered by man.

  • The 8 major soils represented in Richland County include:
    The 8 major soils represented in Richland County include:

    Bennington-Cardington, Canfield-Wooster, Loudonville-Lordstown, Pewamo and Shoals.

  • The lowest point of Richland County
    The lowest point of Richland County

    is found in the northwest corner, close to State Route 598 in Plymouth Township at an elevation of 940 feet.

  • The highest point in Richland County
    The highest point in Richland County

    is in the vicinity of Applehill Orchards on Lexington-Ontario Roads at an elevation 1,510 feet above sea level.

  • Many things live in soil, including:
    Many things live in soil, including:

    Plant roots, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, algae, mites, nematodes, worms, ants, maggots, insects, grubs and larger animals.

  • Generally, soil is made of about 25% air,
    Generally, soil is made of about 25% air,

    25% water, 5% organic matter and 45% minerals.

  • The minerals and microbes in soil are responsible
    The minerals and microbes in soil are responsible

    for filtering, buffering, degrading, immobilizing, and detoxifying organic and inorganic materials, including industrial and municipal by-products and atmospheric deposits.

  • Protect our water by using healthy plants to hold soil in place.
    Protect our water by using healthy plants to hold soil in place.

    Use native plants that can withstand the weather conditions in our area or plant cover crops.

  • 1 inch of water spread out over 1 acre of land
    1 inch of water spread out over 1 acre of land

    would be equal to 27,154 gallons!

  • You should have your water tested
    You should have your water tested

    if you have a private well, lake or pond to determine whether or not it is safe to drink and use.