Richland Soil and Water

fields

Lake Erie CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) 

The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program or CREP, is a federal and state conservation partnership designed to address agriculture-related environmental concerns. Participants receive financial incentives from USDA to voluntarily enroll environmentally sensitive cropland or pastureland in contracts for 15 years. In return for annual rental payments that average about $154 per acre and financial incentives, participants convert the land to native grasses, trees and other conservation vegetation. Enrollment is on a continuous basis, as funding permits. Eligible land must be in the portion of the Lake Erie Watershed and must meet basic eligibility criteria for USDA's Conservation Reserve Program. 

BONUS!!! 

  • An additional $200 per acre incentive will be provided for all newly enrolled filter strip and riparian area practices through February 20, 2020.

Benefits of Conservation Buffers:    

  • Buffers provide another line of defense to filter surface water before it enters streams and water sources that contribute to nutrient loading to Lake Erie
  • Streambanks without buffers tend to be less stable and have higher erosion rates
  • Conservation buffers are a visual demonstration of your commitment to land stewardship                

CREP Landowner Contract 

CREP Sign Up Process

CREP Factsheet

CREP Practices

NRCS EQIP Cover Crop Program 

The NRCS Disaster Recovery EQIP funding opportunity to plant cover crops on flooded cropland acreage. The sign-up began July 1 and continues until the funding is exhausted. 

NRCS News Release

NRCS Prevented Planting Fact Sheet

NRCS Seeding Recommendations

Western Lake Erie Basin Funding

The Ohio Department of Agriculture, in partnership with Richland Soil and Water Conservation District (Richland SWCD) is providing funding for new assistance programs for farmers to help protect water quality within the Upper Sandusky River watershed in the western basin of Lake Erie through the Ohio Working Lands program. 
 

Voluntary Nutrient Management Plan

The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) and the Ohio Agribusiness Association are announcing the expansion of the Voluntary Nutrient Mangement Plan Development to all 4R Certified Nutrient Dealsers in the Western Lake Erie Basin. 

Started as a pilot program with two 4R certified Nutrient Retail providers, the Voluntary Nutrient Management Plan Development Porgram is a partnership with the Ohio Agribusiness Association, in which producers are reimbured for nutrient management plans. The Voluntary Nutrient Management Plans will help to ensure that the 4R principles are put into place.

"The pilot program was a great success and is one more way to encourage farmers to practice the 4R principles on their farms," said Director Pelanda. "We are proud to expand this program that helps farmers implement Nutrient Management Plans that work towards our common goals of soil and water conservation."

"Our members understand how important our role is helping farmers practice proper nutrient stewardship and the 4R's," said Chris Henney, President and CEO of the Ohio Agribusiness Association. "We're excited to be part of these programs and stand ready to help Northwest Ohio farmers."

Producers located in the Western Lake Erie Basin are encouraged to contact their local 4R Nutrient Certified dealers to learn more and sign up for the program. 

For more information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Richland SWCD Agriculture Technician. 

Forage Management

Funding Programs

Buffer Program:  Encourages producers to establish year-round vegetative cover on eligible crop land. The program will promote conversion, establishment and maintenance of forage/hay land on certain cropland acres.  Program enrollment for FY 2020 started June 17. 

 
 

Buffer Criteria for Seeding, Establishment and Maintenance

Buffer Agreement and Verification Form

Small Grains Program:  Encourages producers to plant small grains such as wheat, barley, oats or cereal rye on eligible cropland. This promogram promotes the planting of small grains not only for the conservation benefits, but to provide livestock producers with a longer time period to land apply manure and nutrients.   

Small Grains Fact Sheet

Small Grains Criteria for Seeding and Establishment

Small Grains Guidelines

Small Grains Signup Process

Small Grains Producers Agreement and Verification Form

Ohio Agronomy Guide

Appendix A Cover Crop

 

Ohio Applicator Forecast

The Ohio Applicator Forecast is designed to help nutrient applicators identify times when the weather-risk for applying is low. The risk forecast is created by the National Weather Service and takes snow accumulation and melt, soil moisture content, and forecast precipitation and temperatures into account. The chances of surface runoff in the next 24 hours are displayed on the overview map of the state. If you zoom to street level, seven days of weather conditions and runoff chances are predicted.

Risk is grouped into 3 categories: Low, Medium, and High. When the risk is Medium, it is recommended that the applicator evaluate the situation to determine if there are other locations or later dates when the application could take place.

Click the Forecast Map on the menu above to see the forecast in your area, or the About page for more information about the forecast system.

590 Application Map

This map has been developed utilizing the nutrient application standards from the 2012 Ohio NRCS 590 Nutrient Management Practice Standard. These optional standards were developed to:

  • Budget, supply, and conserve nutrients for plant production.
  • Minimize agricultural nonpoint source pollution of surface and groundwater resources.
  • Properly utilize commercial fertilizer, manure and/or organic by-products as a plant nutrient resource or soil amendment.
  • Protect air quality by reducing odors, nitrogen emissions (ammonia, oxides of nitrogen) and the formation of atmospheric particulates.
  • Maintain or improve the physical, chemical, and biological condition of soil.

The 590 Application Map displays several information categories to help users adopt the 590 guidelines. Information provided on this map includes soil drainage and flooding frequency classes, water table depth, N leaching potential and runoff vulnerability.

Nutrient Regulations

There are a variety of laws, regulations, and guidelines for the management of fertilizers and manures in Ohio. The Nutrient Regulation page summarizes these rules and the areas of Ohio where they apply; for example in 2011 special rules were enacted for watersheds in distress, and again in 2014 for land in the Western Lake Erie Basin.

For more information on the Ohio Applicator Forecast, contact us.